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Articles tagged with: 1929

Crash of 1929 »

Posted on 11 Mar 2013 | 4,695 views
52 Week Highs in the 1929 Stock Market

When we look at stocks making 52 week highs such as Apple (AAPL — $364.90), Netflix (NFLX –$247.55), Priceline (PCLN — $515.64), Chipolte Mexican Grill (CMG — $278.00) or even Wynn Resorts (WYNN — $135.85) we think stock split but that wasn’t the case back in 1929. Although some companies did announce stock splits during that era, there were also many which liked to maintain a high stock price.

Stock Market Crashes »

Posted on 9 Aug 2011 | 5,726 views
Is it a Stock Market Crash When the Dow Jones Industrial Average Drops 1,147 Points Over Three Trading Days?

After “Black Tuesday“, October 29, 1929, Variety declared “Wall Street Lays an Egg” — to describe a drop of 23 percent in the stock market over two days. In the stock market “Crash of 1987”, the Dow Jones Industrial Average lost 22.6 percent of its value in one day. On Monday August 8, 2011 the Dow dropped 634.76 points to 10809.85. Does the sharp decline qualify as a “Stock Market Crash”?

Crash of 1929 »

Posted on 17 Jun 2011 | 4,849 views
Kroger Stock Market Price After October 1929 Crash

Kroger was founded by Bernard Kroger in 1883 in Cincinnati, Ohio. Kroger pioneered the first supermarket surrounded on all four sides by parking lots in the 1930s.

Crash of 1929 »

Posted on 16 Apr 2011 | 10,292 views
Eastman Kodak Stock After 1929 Stock Market Crash

Kodak’s origins rest with Eastman Dry Plate Company and the General Aristo Company, founded by inventor George Eastman in Rochester and Jamestown, New York. The General Aristo Company was formed in 1899 in Jamestown New York, with George Eastman as treasurer, and this company purchased the stock of American Aristotype Company.

Stock Market Crashes »

Posted on 15 Apr 2011 | 5,603 views
Millionaires and Taxes Before the 1929 Crash

The 1920s were fueled by “Easy Money” and was experiencing “Boom Times” like never before because the post-war recession was forgotten as everyone went on a spending spree. The “Introduction of Credit” in the 1920s, and not savings, enabled consumers to boost corporate profits to new levels.