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Articles tagged with: May 6 2010

Stock Market Crashes »

Posted on 9 Mar 2013 | 3,033 views
After Hours Basket Bust Sends Stocks Soaring Then Plunging on Anniversary of the Flash Crash

A trading glitch during the after-hours trading on Monday May 2, 2011 sent dozens of “Bad Trades” on some Healthcare Sector stocks flying. In a matter of minutes, shares of Beckton Dickinson (Stock Symbol: BDX) , Boston Scientific (Stock Symbol: BSX) and McKesson (Stock Symbol: MCK) soared 30% in value.

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Posted on 5 Aug 2011 | 4,516 views
Dow Jones Stock Market Still 30% Overvalued

Whenever the stock market plunges for several days it reminds us the stock market crash in October 1929, which triggered the 12-year great depression that hit all the western industrialized nations. It all began on a “Black Thursday“, Oct. 24, 1929, when share prices on the New York Stock Exchange (NYSE) collapsed. Stock prices plummeted on that day, and continued to fall at an unprecedented rate for a full month.

Headline »

Posted on 21 May 2011 | 7,275 views
Mini Flash Crashes Occurring Daily

Mini Flash Crashes are still occurring routinely with individual stocks, a sign some of the problems that contributed to the short-circuiting of the markets more than a year ago are still happening. Despite efforts to prevent another flash crash, regulators and markets have moved to implement safeguards.

Stock Market Crashes »

Posted on 1 May 2011 | 4,090 views
SEC Circuit Breaker Rules Fails to Stop Jazz Pharmaceuticals Flash Crash

Shares of Jazz Pharmaceuticals (Stock Symbol: JAZZ) opened the trading day on April 27, 2011 at $33.59 per share, the stock then went on to trade down slightly with normal volume until approximately 10:00 AM EST, when it plummeted for approximately two minutes before finding a bottom at $23.50 per share.

Stock Market Crashes »

Posted on 22 Apr 2011 | 2,842 views
Apple and Cisco 2011 Mini Flash Crashes Kept Quiet

When the “Flash Crash” wiped some $1 trillion of companies’ market value on May 6, 2010, when the US Dow Jones Industrial Average dropped 700 points before rebounding in a matter of minutes, the sudden plunge in stock prices was partially due to computers setup with “High-Frequency Trading Strategies“, in which thousands of orders to buy and sell shares are executed in fractions of a second.