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Articles tagged with: October 29 1929

Crash of 1929 »

Posted on 7 Mar 2013 | 8,501 views
New York Stock Exchange DJIA Stocks on October 29 1929

The Roaring Twenties, the decade that led up to the Crash, was a time of wealth and excess. Despite caution of the dangers of speculation, many believed that the market could sustain high price levels. Shortly before the crash, economist Irving Fisher famously proclaimed, “Stock prices have reached what looks like a permanently high plateau.”

Stock Market Crashes »

Posted on 9 Aug 2011 | 4,728 views
Is it a Stock Market Crash When the Dow Jones Industrial Average Drops 1,147 Points Over Three Trading Days?

After “Black Tuesday“, October 29, 1929, Variety declared “Wall Street Lays an Egg” — to describe a drop of 23 percent in the stock market over two days. In the stock market “Crash of 1987”, the Dow Jones Industrial Average lost 22.6 percent of its value in one day. On Monday August 8, 2011 the Dow dropped 634.76 points to 10809.85. Does the sharp decline qualify as a “Stock Market Crash”?

Featured »

Posted on 5 Jun 2011 | 12,218 views
10 Worst Stock Trading Days in Wall Street History

Lately, some analysts and traders have been predicting there will be another market crash in 2011 and that Wall Street will be once again be exposed to “Insider Trading” scandals, “Ponzi Schemes” and “Fraudulent Companies” making false claims on earnings.

Crash of 1929 »

Posted on 20 Apr 2011 | 6,400 views
Goldman Sachs Stock Price After Market Crash from 1929 to 1931

Marcus Goldman began trading in promissory notes in 1869. Goldman’s son-in-law, Samuel Sachs, joined the business in 1882. The firm expanded into a general partnership in 1885 as Goldman, Sachs & Co. when Goldman’s son Henry and son-in-law Ludwig Dreyfus joined the group.

Crash of 1929 »

Posted on 19 Apr 2011 | 4,604 views
Gillette Razor Stock After 1929 Stock Market Crash

The original “Gillette” Company was founded by King Camp Gillette in 1895 as a safety razor manufacturer. While working as a salesman for the Crown Cork and Seal Company in the 1890s, Gillette saw bottle caps, with the cork seal he sold, thrown away after the bottle was opened. This made him recognize the value in basing a business on a product that was used a few times, then discarded.