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Crash of 1929 »

Posted on 11 Mar 2013 | 4,600 views
52 Week Highs in the 1929 Stock Market

When we look at stocks making 52 week highs such as Apple (AAPL — $364.90), Netflix (NFLX –$247.55), Priceline (PCLN — $515.64), Chipolte Mexican Grill (CMG — $278.00) or even Wynn Resorts (WYNN — $135.85) we think stock split but that wasn’t the case back in 1929. Although some companies did announce stock splits during that era, there were also many which liked to maintain a high stock price.

Crash of 1929 »

Posted on 7 Mar 2013 | 10,566 views
New York Stock Exchange DJIA Stocks on October 29 1929

The Roaring Twenties, the decade that led up to the Crash, was a time of wealth and excess. Despite caution of the dangers of speculation, many believed that the market could sustain high price levels. Shortly before the crash, economist Irving Fisher famously proclaimed, “Stock prices have reached what looks like a permanently high plateau.”

Stock Market Crashes »

Posted on 14 Apr 2011 | 10,411 views
The Financial Bank Panic of 1907

After the demise of the second bank, state-chartered and uncharted “free banks” took root and these banks issued their own notes, redeemable in gold or silver. Though the National Banking Act, passed in 1863, tried to provide a measure of currency stability, bank runs and financial panics remained common into the early 20th century.

Bear Markets »

Posted on 25 Mar 2011 | 8,002 views
1929 thru 1932 DJIA Bear Market Performance

It took almost three years for the “Dow” to reach the bottom. The 1929 crash was a dramatic drop with the Dow dropping almost 50% in just over two months. However, the Dow’s decline was far from over in terms of either extent or breadth. The market continued its decline for another two and a half years — through the first half of 1932.

Crash of 1929 »

Posted on 25 Mar 2011 | 7,246 views
Black Monday and Black Tuesday Dow Stock Prices

Monday October 28, 1929 was the first “Black Monday“, where investors decided to get out of the market and the Dow Jones Industrial Average collapsed 38.33 points, or 12.82% on the day. The next day was “Black Tuesday“, October 29, 1929, where the Dow Jones Industrial Average lost an additional 30.57 points, or 11.73% on the day.